Here are many of the Buteyko exercises as taught by Mim Beim. These videos are also available on YouTube.             

Control Pause

Control Pause (CP) is a staple of Buteyko Breathing. It is used as a measure of your progression. In general, the higher your CP, the healthier you will be.



Nose Clearing Exercise

If your nose is blocked and congested, the Nose Clearing Exercise can help to open up the airways so you can breathe freely. Good to use before a session of Buteyko Breathing.




Small Breath Holds

Small Breath Holds is a gentle breathing exercise that helps reset the respiratory centre in the brain. It is particularly helpful for anxiety, at times of stress to help you get to sleep.

 

3 x 3 Breath Hold

 


Walking with 'Breath Holds'

Walking with ‘Breath Holds’ helps retrain your breathing pattern. Building up a tolerance for breath holding. Can also be done when jogging, cycling, swimming.




Steps

Steps is a challenging Buteyko Breathing Exercise that helps to recalibrate the brain’s breathing centre. Walk for as long as you can whilst holding your breath. Good for improving athletic performance.

 




Reduced Volume Breathing - One Nostril Breathing

Reduced Volume Breathing (RVB) exercises are designed to retrain the respiratory centre in the brain. The aim is to experience a tolerable desire to breathe. One Nostril Breathing is one type of RVB.



Reduced Volume Breathing - 'Cupping'

Reduced Volume Breathing (RVB) exercises are designed to retrain the respiratory centre in the brain. The aim is to experience a tolerable desire to breathe. Cupping is one type of RVB.



Reduced Volume Breathing - 'Still' Breathing

Reduced Volume Breathing (RVB) exercises are designed to retrain the respiratory centre in the brain. The aim is to experience a tolerable desire to breathe. ‘Still Breathing’ is one type of RVB.

 



Diaphragmatic Breathing - Belly Breathing

The Diaphragm (DY-AH-FRAM) is a muscle that separates the chest from the belly. It is the main breathing muscle, however, most people don’t use their diaphragm effectively.



Correct Tongue Position

Your tongue should rest lightly on the roof of your mouth, just behind the front teeth. This helps keep the jaw in the correct position and keeps the upper airway open